<![CDATA[www.cookeryandcakery.com]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.1 <![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Pineapple-Coconut Muffins]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/pineapple-coconut-muffins/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/pineapple-coconut-muffins/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Pineapple-Coconut Muffins

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Since I had such success with the cherry-coconut muffins, I decided to use some of the pineapple sitting in the fridge to make a variation. But I have a problem. When I use fresh fruit in muffins, I think, “I love fruit. Fruit is good. So more fruit will make these even better.” And, yes, loading a muffin with fruit can be tasty, but it can also make it heavy. So these need a little tweaking—and a little restraint on my part—before they’re light and fluffy and perfect. But still, a nice Sunday-morning breakfast. The recipe is basically the same as the cherry-coconut muffins, with somewhere between 1/2 and 3/4 cup diced fresh pineapple swapped out for the dried cherries and the zest of one orange added.

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This entry was posted on Sunday, July 27th, 2008 at 10:24 PM and is filed under baked goods, breakfast, coconut, muffins, pineapple. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » A Fresh Pasta Virgin No More]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/11/a-fresh-pasta-virgin-no-more/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/11/a-fresh-pasta-virgin-no-more/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A Fresh Pasta Virgin No More

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The other day I came to a somewhat embarrassing realization: Bridget Jones’s Diary is my favorite movie. Sure, if asked I’ll always says it’s Annie Hall, but it’s not. When it’s cold outside and I’m home alone and I want to spend an evening on the couch watching a movie, it’s usually Bridget Jones. So it was to her that I turned to keep me company as I embarked on my first attempt at homemade pasta. After all, no matter what happened to my noodles, I would never end up eating a dinner as disgusting as blue soup, omelet with green gunge, and marmalade.

With my nice new shint pasta machine clamped down to the counter, I started to play, using a recipe from Bryanna Clark Grogan that used chicpea flour as a binding protein. The dough looked great, very pliable, and I ran a few test pieces through to clean out the machine. Then I ran them through again. And again. And as it turned out, pretty much my whole batch of dough was used to clean out the machine, even though we still had to eat it. It was rather frustrating to see bits of grit in my otherwise wonderful looking pasta, and I spent the rest of night convinced that I had specks of chrome stuck in my throat, so hopefully the machine is good and clean by now.

The rolling process was not nearly as fun as I thought it would be. I imagined some sort of wonderful eadible version of the Play-Doh Fun Factory, but as my countertops got more and more full and the oven made my kitchen more and more unbearable and my stomach became more and more restless, the fun was kind of gone. But next time will be different, because I’ve learned a few things.

1) Start with an immacualately clean kitchen. Don’t have a rack of biscotti cooling on one counter, a stack of dishwasher ready dishes on the other, bits and pieces for a side dish on yet another. Make room, or you might go crazy.

2) Chickpea flour is temperamental and shouldn’t be kept in a cupboard for nearly a year. While the pasta had a wonderful texture in the end, it had a bit of an off taste. And while this could have been metal and grease and other disgustingness posioning me (or my imagination thinking that was the case), it was probably some past its prime besan. Next time it’s going in refrigerator.

3) When you’re making something for the very first time that’s somewhat complicated and will take a bit of learning to master, don’t make any other dishes that take more than five minutes (or one bowl/pan). The crostini with roasted onions and swiss chard was great (even though I forgot to toast the bread until everything else was cooked and got to impatient to actually get it crispy), but it was far too involved to make when all of my attention should have been on the pasta.

4) Drink wine while eating, not while cooking. Franticness and a near buzz are not good companions. Especially on an empty stomach.

5) If you’re too impatient to let the pasta dry a bit before cooking it, it will stick together. I knew this would happen, but after two hours in the kitchen I didn’t really care.

And now that I know these things, my next pasta-making excursion will by completely painless and will convince me that I’m a culinary genius and can whip up fresh pasta every single night, right? OK, maybe not. But it will be easier. And hopefully with at least 90% less “facotry grit and sediment.” Yum.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, November 12th, 2008 at 11:07 PM and is filed under fresh pasta, pasta. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery ]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/2/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/2/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A Simple Sweet Potato

Posted by kara on October 5th, 2009

"Roasted

Never have I been subjected to sweet potatoes sullied by the addition of sugar and marshmallows. This is pure insanity to me. Kind of like taking a taste of soy sauce and saying, “Yeah, it’s salty, but you know what would make it better? Put some salt in it.” Sweet potatoes are sweet. It’s right in the name. Don’t mess with them.

The idea of a vegetable side dish that looks more like a super-rich dessert is disturbing enough, but the truth is, sweet potatoes are one of the most delicious, well-balanced foods in existence. Baked in a hot oven until they get all squishy, they are so hard to resist that I always get a blast of steam in my face when I plunge the knife in the crackly skin. Then I top it with small dabs of Earth Balance and flaky, crunchy Maldon sea salt for a comforting lunch that somehow seems indulgent—creamy, sweet, salty, buttery, utter perfection.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Soy-Mirin Tofu with Snow Peas and Peanut Sauce]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/soy-mirin-tofu-with-snow-peas-and-peanut-sauce/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/soy-mirin-tofu-with-snow-peas-and-peanut-sauce/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Soy-Mirin Tofu with Snow Peas and Peanut Sauce

"Soy-mirin

The other morning, as I walked from the office kitchen to my desk, tea in hand, I craved peanut sauce. I needed it. And right at that moment. No matter that it was ten A.M. or that the smells in the air consisted of nothing more than over-roasted coffee and fake-maple-laden instant oatmeal (and a few things less savory, I’m sure). I wanted peanut sauce. But not just any peanut sauce. I wanted the vinaigrette-thin, slightly grainy peanut sauce from Vegan Yum Yum, the one that accompanies soy-mirin-glazed tofu and blanched snow peas.

It took me a long time to come around to peanut sauce, and I can blame it all on one thing: Peanut Sauce Delight. The Vietnamese/Thai/Japanese restaurant I worked at after college had a truly repellent dish by that name on the menu. Once in a while a customer would be swayed by it, and any waitress who wanted a decent tip would do everything in their power to unsway them. But if that failed we would have to deliver a bowl filled with peanut sauce, a smattering of broccoli, and a few pieces of tofu/chicken/beef, served with a very inadequate portion of mostly dried up, often leftover (and sometimes, if the owner was around, “saved” from another diner’s plate) jasmine rice. Let me repeat that: a bowl filled with peanut sauce. But this wasn’t any peanut sauce. This was the same thick, gloppy mixture that accompanied the satay appetizers—and was too rich in even that small amount. It resembled nothing so much as peanut butter soup with broccoli croutons. And I never once saw anyone eat more than a few bites.

But once I got over the horrors of Peanut Sauce Delight, I began to embrace peanut butter as a suitable ingredient in Asian dishes. When mixed with sweetness and acid, such as lime juice or rice wine vinegar, and used sparingly, it could be downright delicious. This sauce serves as more of a garnish, giving the rice, tofu, snow peas, and shredded carrots the perfect hint of salty and sweet.

I used the recipe in the Vegan Yum Yum cookbook, but this recipe is nearly identical except for the broccoli. I may never recover from Peanut Sauce Delight enough to accept the combination of broccoli and peanut sauce.

Tags: peanut sauce, snow peas, tofu, VeganMoFo

This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 6th, 2009 at 11:03 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Chocolate-dipped Hazelnut Biscotti]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/chocolate-dipped-hazelnut-biscotti/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/chocolate-dipped-hazelnut-biscotti/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Chocolate-dipped Hazelnut Biscotti

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Friday was my co-worker Chris’s last day, and since I was losing my vegan ally, I made biscotti. I used the recipe from Veganomicon quite a few times already, but this was a new combination (I still think the orange chocolate chip is my favorite, especially with a cup of Earl Grey tea). I used the basic recipe, subbed hazelnuts for almonds, and omitted the anise (I despise anything that tastes like licorice, and a lot of things taste like licorice. Yuck). I’ve tried the chocolate hazelnut biscotti recipe in the past, but they turned out too soft, so cocoa powder doesn’t seem to mix with biscotti too well. I never think the cookies are going to get crispy enough when they’re still warm; they always seem rather soft and gooey. But they work every time, turning out perfectly crisp. When these were baked and cooled, I melted chocolate chips with a bit of soy milk and one end of the biscotti in it. I had to put them in refrigerator for the chocolate to set, and the cold biscotti in a wamr cup of coffee was a great combination. And they were a hit at the office. Score one for veganism!

Before baking

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After first baking

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After second baking

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This entry was posted on Monday, April 7th, 2008 at 11:21 PM and is filed under baked goods, biscotti, chocolate, cookies, dessert, hazelnut. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Dandies Dessert Pizza]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/05/dandies-dessert-pizza/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/05/dandies-dessert-pizza/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Dandies Dessert Pizza

"Dandies

I always try to come up with something interesting when we have friends over for pizza, but sometimes I get stuck in a mushroom-olive-spinach rut. Luckily tonight we had some leftover dough and a fresh shipment of (new extra-puffy) Dandies vegan marshmallows on the counter and Dan suggested that we put them together. Ryan, the Dandies maker himself, was resistant to the idea, preferring to gorge on Teese-piled pies, but by the time the dessert pizza was out of the oven he admitted, into the video camera even, that he was wrong and what was in front of him was nothing short of genius. And I think Dan—who insisted I put chocolate only on half the pie, decrying the combination of strawberries and chocolate as “sex food”—realized the error in his thinking as well.

"Dandies

"Dandies

"Dandies

Dandies Dessert Pizza

1 batch pizza dough

1 cup frozen strawberries

scant 1/4 cup powdered sugar, plus extra for sprinkling edge

1 Tbsp cornstarch

enough Dandies to scatter over dough

coarsely chopped chocolate (or chocolate chips)

1 Tbsp or so agave nectar or simple syrup

Preheat oven to 550.

Puree strawberries in blender until smooth. Add a splash or two of soy milk if needed to get it going. Sift in powdered sugar and cornstarch and transfer to a small saucepan. Heat on medium, stirring continuously, until the sauce thickens.

Prepare your pizza dough and spread with strawberry sauce. Bake for about 10 minutes, or until the outside edge of the crust is just beginning to get a little golden.

Heat broiler to high. Scatter Dandies onto pizza and place under broiler. Broil until marshmallows begin to brown, then scatter on chocolate and continue to broil until marshmallows are puffy and toasted, chocolate is melted, and outer rim of crust is crispy, but watch it closely so nothing burns.

Thin agave with a touch of water (simple syrup should be good as is) and bush on edge of crust. Sift a bit more powdered sugar on top of the agave-glazed crust.

"Dandies

Tags: chocolate, Dandies, dessert, marshmallows, pizza, strawberry

This entry was posted on Saturday, May 15th, 2010 at 10:43 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Almond Crusted Tofu]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/05/almond-crusted-tofu/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/05/almond-crusted-tofu/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Almond Crusted Tofu

""The moment I saw the pistachio crusted tofu on Fat Free Vegan, I immediately wanted it. But of course when I went to Whole Foods that night, they were all out of shelled pistachios. So almond crusted tofu it was! Sure, it’s not as pretty as the original, being so beige and all, but it’s still crunchy and delicious. And I learned that the combination of Veganaise, German mustard, maple syrup, and soy sauce actually tastes good. So all in all a success, and a good way to use up the ridiculous amount of almonds lingering in my freezer, hiding behind leftover chickpea cutlets and half-used flours.

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This entry was posted on Saturday, May 24th, 2008 at 8:52 PM and is filed under almonds, entree, sweet and sour sauce, tofu. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Vegan BLT Salad]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/vegan-blt-salad/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/vegan-blt-salad/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Vegan BLT Salad

"tempeh-bacon-on-toast"I’ve been vegan for nearly fifteen years, but it wasn’t until about two years ago that I succumbed to the most intimidating member of the protein triumvirate: tempeh. And it took even longer to come around to what is now one of my favorite convenience foods, Fakin’ Bacon. Since I gave up the real thing somewhere around age ten, I never really felt the need for a replacement product. Plus, it had one of my most hated flavors, liquid smoke. Smokiness reminds me more of the neighborhood house I watched burn to the ground at five more than a fourth of July spent in the cloud of a backyard grill. But once I sucked it up and finally bought my first package of Fakin’ Bacon (probably to toss on top of pizza), I was hooked.

My favorite use of Fakin’ Bacon is ridiculously simple. I heat up two slices in a dry skillet, lightly toast one piece of bread, slather on a bit of Vegenaise, and plop the bacon on top. Tempeh on toast. It’s the absolute perfect snack when it’s one o’clock on a Sunday afternoon and I realize that I’m starving but don’t have time to make a proper lunch before I have to fold yet another load of laundry. And it keeps me from eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich again.

Almost knocking tempeh on toast out of first place is the BLT salad. Why it took me so long to put spinach and tomato and croutons and tempeh bacon together and cover it all in a garlicky mayonnaise dressing I have no idea. It’s so simple. So obvious. Yet so genius.

"vegan-BLT-salad"

Vegan BLT Salad Dressing

2 Tbsp Vegenaise

1 Tbsp soy milk

1 tsp red wine vinegar

1 tsp mustard powder

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp sugar

1/2 tsp minced garlic

Whisk ingredients together. Pour over spinach, tomatoes, and warm tempeh bacon and toss with croutons.

Tags: salad, salad dressing, tempeh, tempeh bacon, VeganMoFo

This entry was posted on Wednesday, October 21st, 2009 at 10:34 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo #6: Vegan Dad’s Tempeh Burgers]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-6-vegan-dads-tempeh-burgers/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-6-vegan-dads-tempeh-burgers/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #6: Vegan Dad’s Tempeh Burgers

""I read Vegan Dad every day. I love that his recipes usually quick and kid friendly yet still imaginative. I appreciate a good fancy dish with twelve different steps that I have to start the night before, but those recipes don’t help me on a Wednesday night when I got home late from work and just want to eat something tasty as soon as possible before watching Project Runway. That’s one of the reasons I am completely in love with these tempeh burgers—they take fifteen or twenty minutes to make, start to finish. And they freeze well for even faster meals. But the real reason this is going into regular rotation? They’re freaking incredible. I’m so sick of making veggie burgers that fall apart in the skillet or on the plate. These hold together wonderfully, even if you make them really thin. In fact, the thinner you go, the better they get. Nice and crispy, and there’s more room for toppings! I know from experience that it’s a little difficult to cram half an avocado on a typical veggie burger. And what’s a burger without half an avocado and a smear of Veganaise?
I’ve changed up the spices in these based on what I’ve had around (and also because fennel seed is the work of the devil) and they’ve always come out tasty. Vegan Dad has changed the recipe since publishing this version, but as it includes homemade sausages that I’m ulikely to have around, these will remain the winner. Oh, and another plus? With one package of tempeh, a bit of wheat gluten, bread crumbs from the heels of a loaf of bread, and a bunch of spices, I can get six burgers, enough for two family meals. With a cheap meal like that as part of my grocery list, I might not cry the next time I have to pay nine dollars for maple syrup.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, October 15th, 2008 at 9:41 PM and is filed under Veganaise, avocado, burgers, sandwich, tempeh. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo #4: Chickpea Leek Soup]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-4-chickpea-leek-soup/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-4-chickpea-leek-soup/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #4: Chickpea Leek Soup

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I’ve been sick for a few days and today is grey and rainy, so obviously it’s soup time! I love love love soup. Could eat it every day. Well, at least when it’s cold out, which means about nine months in Chicago. The problem is, Dan and Matilda aren’t so stoked on soup. Usually a loaf of bread and some olive oil for dipping will cure that though. This particular soup I start to crave as soon as fall hits. It’s so velvety and luscious and simple, with just leeks, garlic, potato, and chickpeas. It’s from The Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver, only tweaked a little bit to use canned beans, which makes it pretty fast to pull together. (The only other recipe I’ve tried from the book is the basic risotto recipe, which is perfect and I use all the time as a base. It has teeny bits of celery that stay crunchy for a nice contrast.) I’m still a total loser when it comes to photographing soup, so it looks like a mess of yellow goo, but it’s pretty outstanding, especially sprinkled with sea salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, and a drizzle of olive oil. The perfect thing to soothe my itchy throat.

Hey, that’s a lot of leeks!

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 at 8:30 PM and is filed under VeganMoFo, beans, chickpeas, leeks, soup. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Brownies, a Failure]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/05/brownies-a-failure/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/05/brownies-a-failure/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Brownies, a Failure

"veganOnce, I had a good vegan brownie. Once. It was my friend Megan’s birthday, and a bunch of ladies met at the Peninsula for high tea. The vegan offerings, while extremely appreciated in such a traditional setting, were hit or miss. The hits: tiny lemon-poppy-seed muffin tops, cranberry-chutney-and-arugula sandwiches, mushroom stacks with pesto. The misses: peanut butter muffins that tasted like freezer burn, under ripe strawberries covered in crunchy unremarkable chocolate, and anything involving tofu (watery parfaits, grainy cheesecake). But the brownies saved it all (well, those and the champagne). They were dense, moist, fudgy, with a crispy top, studded with tiny walnut bits. They were real brownies. They were everything a brownie should be, vegan or not.

"vegan"vegan

See, the problem (or I guess I should say problems) with vegan brownies is that the name usually holds no weight. They’re not brownies. They’re flat chocolate cake, too moist and fluffy. Or they’re square chocolate cookies, too dry and crumbly. They never seem to achieve that balance of gooey and firm, resisting and melty.

"vegan"vegan

So I decided, screw it, I’ll skip all of those inferior vegan brownie recipes and take my chances with a solid-sounding traditional one. Armed with Alice Medrich’s Bittersweet and a bar of Scharffen Berger 99% cacao unsweetened chocolate, I headed to the kitchen. For the seemingly manageable two eggs, I subbed some extra gooey flax goop and a bit of soy yogurt. I melted the chocolate with an unseemly amount of Earth Balance. I dutifully pre-toasted the walnuts. And everything seemed to be going well. The batter looked thick and fudgy and tasted amazing. But that’s when my luck ran out. The oven did little to turn my promising batter into the brownie perfection I was hoping for. It baked for the recommended thirty minutes. Definitely not brownies yet. That’s fine; vegan baked goods always seem to take a bit longer than their egg-laden counterparts. In they stayed for the additional five minutes the recipe said might be necessary. Hmmm. Is that a layer of wet, bubbly fat resting on top of the deep brown still-not-brownies? Another ten minutes. And another. And perhaps another. But then I gave up. By now I had a heavy chocolate brick, unappealingly caramelized on the bottom, covered in melted, unabsorbed margarine on the top.

"vegan"vegan

Maybe I’ll eventually overcome this utter baking disaster and go on to discover the perfect vegan brownie recipe, but it may be easier to set my sights on becoming a lady who lunches so I can spend many more afternoons sipping earl grey and nibbling on pastries at the Peninsula.

"vegan

Tags: brownies, chocolate, dessert, failure

This entry was posted on Saturday, May 29th, 2010 at 1:41 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » About]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/about/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/about/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com About

This is an example of a WordPress page, you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Two of My Favorite Quick Meals]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/two-of-my-favorite-quick-meals/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/two-of-my-favorite-quick-meals/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:05 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Two of My Favorite Quick Meals

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Sometimes I get jealous when I hear people say that everything they know about cooking they learned from their mother. I sure didn’t. Everything I know about cooking–and pretty much everything else–I learned from Martha Stewart. It infuriates me to watch her current show, because she just kisses minor celebrity ass while throwing a few things in a pot, and it’s impossible to actually learn anything. But once upon a time Martha took me from Minute Rice to risotto. And half of the recipes I turn to again and again come from Martha, one of my favorites being soy-glazed tofu and carrots. It’s simple, it’s sweet and salty and crunchy and mushy, and it always makes my husband, Dan, happy. Sometimes I add other vegetables (like the asparagus here) or serve it over rice, but most of the time the tofu and carrots are enough to totally satisfy. If only I could keep the broiler from turning the cookie sheets all burnt and nasty.

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The open-faced seitan sandwiches from Table for Two by Joanne Stepaniak is another winner. I must make this once a week. It takes maybe twenty minutes and is super comforting, especially when it’s cold outside. And the saltiness goes perfectly with mashed sweet potatoes (which I love so much, I’ve been known to eat nothing but for dinner when I’m home alone).

And because the tofu and carrots pics turned out so well, here are a couple more.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008 at 11:18 PM and is filed under carrots, entree, sandwich, seitan, sweet potato, tofu. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Teese Vegan Cheese]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/teese-vegan-cheese/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/teese-vegan-cheese/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Teese Vegan Cheese

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I’ve been lucky enough to be a guinea pig for Teese Vegan Cheese, and I think I’ve probably blown through at least five pounds already. Of course, I’ve had help eating it, but I have been more full of cheese lately than even in my life. It’s super melty (just look at that cheese toast above!), doesn’t mold in the refrigerator after two days like some other vegan cheeses (in fact, I’ve had some in the fridge for weeks now that’s still good), and tastes great (even though my cheese memories are about thirteen years old now, it tastes like what I think cheese should taste like). But the best part? It holds all the toppings on a pizza! The one thing that has always irritated me about vegan pizza is when you bite in and half the toppings slide off onto your plate (maybe my love of way too much sauce has a little bit to do with that too). So far pizza has been my main Teese use, but I’m still working on a gooey mac &amp; cheese that I’ll post about soon.

The first Teese pizzas

I made the pizza-dough recipe from Vegan with a Vengeance, which is basically the same as every other pizza-dough recipe I consulted but with extra sugar and olive oil. The crust was perfect, and the pizzas were delicious, with peppers, mushrooms, and olives.

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The weeknight Teese pizza

We picked up some dough from Whole Foods, which they keep in the refrigerator. This isn’t so great for when you want pizza NOW, as the dough is impossible to stretch. Plus, it turned out too chewy for my liking, but Dan loved it. Still tasty though. Peppers, mushrooms, onions, olives, and store-bought veggie pepperoni (which I usually pick off).

""Pizza party

When in the possession of large quantities of melty cheese, it’s definitely time for a pizza party. I made the VwaV dough again, only this time I made it too early and let it rise for over an hour too long, which made the dough too soft and resulted in holes (there were also some oven sticking disasters, which are best never mentioned again). For one batch of dough, I replaced half of the flour with whole wheat pastry flour and added some agave nectar, and that batch turned out wonderfully, light and crispy and wheaty. The first pizza was my favorite: blanched red-skinned potatoes, roasted garlice, roasted asparagus, rosemary, and Teese. The combination was spectacular. I wish I’d made three more of the same.

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This one was sort of hodgepodge (and not the prettiest pizza in its class). VwaV pizza sauce (DO NOT use canned tomatoes with added salt. It so super, super salty, and I even halved the salt called for), roasted garlic, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, mushrooms, olives, Teese.

""This one has my homemade seitan pepperoni (adapted form the seitan o’ greatness recipe), which turned out pretty awesome. Everyone was snacking on it while we waited for the pizzas to bake.

Baked Seitan Pepperoni

1 1/2 cups vital wheat gluten
1/4 cup nutritional yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
2 tsp paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper

3/4 cup water
4 Tbsp tomato paste
3 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, grated

Combine wet ingredients in one bowl and dry another, then add wet to dry and knead for a few minutes until elastic and somewhat tight. Divide into two logs and wrap tightly in foil (be careful not to rip the foil, but try to get the logs as tight as possible). Bake for 90 minutes at 350.

""The pesto pizza seemed to be the hit of the night. Homemade pesto, roasted garlice, roasted red peppers, caramelized onions, Teese. Tomato sauce is so over done. Pesto!

""
Leftover pizza

We had tons left over from the pizza party, so Dan and I had pizza again a few nights later. I used Whole Foods dough again, but after it warmed up a bit it was (slightly) easier to work with. But I think the non-stretchiness worked well, because this was the absolute anti-minimalist pizza. It turned out thicker than deep dish, with the bottom of the dough nice and crispy and the inside super doughy. We piled everything on here. Pesto, roasted garlice, roasted red peppers, caramelized onions, mushrooms olives, seitan pepperoni. It was pretty incredible.

""""

This entry was posted on Thursday, April 3rd, 2008 at 9:39 PM and is filed under Teese vegan cheese, entree, parties, pizza. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Vegan Fondue Party]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/vegan-fondue-party/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/vegan-fondue-party/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Vegan Fondue Party

"vegan-fondue-party"The first time I made fondue, I got drunk. We invited our friends Jay and Jennifer and their kids over for some celebratory dipping. It was before Dan was vegan, or even vegetarian, and since we only had one fondue pot, I had to cook my nutritional-yeast-based sauce in a pan on the stove and eat out of the cooling pot at the table. I based the fondue on my usual nutritional-yeast sauce, only I subbed wine for the water. ALL of the water. And I didn’t think about the fact that I needed to cook off the alcohol before serving. So as soon as the sauce began to thicken, I began my dipping. With every hunk of bread and asparagus spear I ingested more and more alcohol, and by the end of the meal I was more than a little tipsy without having taken one drink. But damn was it tasty.

My next foray into fondue took a few years, but this time it was among all vegans, and since there was a small child involved, I opted for apple cider rather than wine, but I stuck to the basic nutritional-yeast formula. The thing was, since I was sort of winging it that first time, every subsequent trial of apple-cider fondue turned out differently, and most were sickeningly sweet. I have since learned to write things down. Most of the time, at least.

Mary, Megan, and I had been talking about throwing a fondue party for nearly a year, but there were always other parties, holidays, obligations. Plus, the only open dates seemed to fall during warm weather, and fondue and air conditioning just seems like a ridiculous combination. When we finally had an appropriately chilly date set, I planned on finally perfecting the apple-cider fondue, but then I made a vegan mornay sauce and realized it would make the perfect fondue. Cheesy, melty, able to cling to the crevices of roasted cauliflower, and just drippy enough to make me wish a had remembered to lay down a tablecloth.

As for dessert, I can’t take credit for that, except for a batch of orange-scented mini madeleines. Megan made peanut butter caramel fondue and Mary made chocolate marshmallow fondue. We probably could’ve skipped right to dessert and been completely happy. And completely nauseous.

"dessert-fondue-dippers"

"vegan-dessert-fondue"

Tags: desserts, entrees, fondue, sauces, VeganMoFo

This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at 10:13 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Orange-glazed Tempeh]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/orange-glazed-tempeh/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/orange-glazed-tempeh/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Orange-glazed Tempeh

"orange-glazedThere’s something extremely intimidating about tempeh. Seitan is meaty enough to seem familiar, bready enough to be accepted by the uninitiated. Tofu is bland enough to soak up flavors and hide its true nature. But tempeh? It hardly ever shows up on restaurant menus, even in all-vegan restaurants, so even those of us who should be familiar with it often aren’t. Plus, every recipe for tempeh seems to include a caveat about tricking the tempeh into releasing its iron grip on bitterness.

It took me a long time to come around to tempeh, but now I can’t seem to get enough. Lately most forms of soy seem to give me stomach aches, but I never have problems with tempeh, so I get my soy protein fix without the nasty side effects. And did I mention that it’s actually delicious? Its substantial texture lets it stand up at the center of the plate. Sometimes vegan meals can feel like a hodgepodge of side dishes, but throw some tempeh in there and you’ve got a meal.

This orange-glazed tempeh from 101 Cookbooks is my new favorite way to prepare tempeh, and I’ve only made it once so far. It’s just too good to wait to write about it. I’m already thinking of what I can pair it with next. And I can’t wait.

(I made the recipe as is, with the exception of reducing the oil from 2 Tbsp to 1. The tempeh might brown more deeply with the extra oil, but I don’t think the added fat is neccessary.)

Tags: entrees, orange, tempeh

This entry was posted on Thursday, October 15th, 2009 at 11:09 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Cook’s Illustrated Recipes]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/cooks-illustrated-recipes/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/04/cooks-illustrated-recipes/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Cook’s Illustrated Recipes

""Last weekend I got the new issue of Cook’s Illustrated in the mail. The few issues I’ve received so far haven’t much excited me; lots of tips on searing roasts and other useless things, plus a lot of stuff I already know. But this latest issue was actually pretty good. So good in fact, that I made two of the recipes soon after reading through them for the first time. The first was lemon artichoke hummus. I’ve made hummus countless times, and I’ve always loved it that way it was, which was somewhat on the chunky side. But this turned out super smooth, like restaurant hummus, only with tons more flavor. The complexities were lost when I put it on a sandwich the next day, but it was the perfect dipping hummus, especially with baked pita chips.

""The next day I made spring vegetable risotto, which was also fantastic. (Unfortunately the pictures didn’t turn out as well.) It had leeks, peas, asparagus, and lemon juice and was topped with gremolata with parsley, mint, and lemon zest, which added so much flavor to the dish. This may be my favorite risotto, but I think I just love risotto in general. Something about all that stirring makes it seem very special.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, April 9th, 2008 at 9:26 PM and is filed under appetizer, artichoke, asparagus, dip, entree, hummus, lemon, peas, rice, risotto. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery ]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/3/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/3/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #4: Chickpea Leek Soup

Posted by kara on October 7th, 2008

""
I’ve been sick for a few days and today is grey and rainy, so obviously it’s soup time! I love love love soup. Could eat it every day. Well, at least when it’s cold out, which means about nine months in Chicago. The problem is, Dan and Matilda aren’t so stoked on soup. Usually a loaf of bread and some olive oil for dipping will cure that though. This particular soup I start to crave as soon as fall hits. It’s so velvety and luscious and simple, with just leeks, garlic, potato, and chickpeas. It’s from The Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver, only tweaked a little bit to use canned beans, which makes it pretty fast to pull together. (The only other recipe I’ve tried from the book is the basic risotto recipe, which is perfect and I use all the time as a base. It has teeny bits of celery that stay crunchy for a nice contrast.) I’m still a total loser when it comes to photographing soup, so it looks like a mess of yellow goo, but it’s pretty outstanding, especially sprinkled with sea salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, and a drizzle of olive oil. The perfect thing to soothe my itchy throat.

Hey, that’s a lot of leeks!

""

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Coconut-Cherry Muffins]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/06/coconut-cherry-muffins/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/06/coconut-cherry-muffins/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Coconut-Cherry Muffins

""This is officially the first baked-good recipe that I have developed 100% on my own, with no inspiration or measurements or anything from another source. And I expected to have to make a few trials, tweak it a bit here and there, but the first time was pretty perfect. Beginner’s luck I guess. The muffins came out light and airy, moist but not soggy, and the flavors were wonderful together. The dried Rainier cherries came from Trader Joe’s, one of those things that look good on the shelf so you buy them, thinking . . . some day. But now that my tiny little pantry cupboard is so full that things fall out of it when I open the door, it’s time to use up those some day items. But I’m sure these would work fine with any dried fruit. Maybe that dried mango I bought for some day.

Coconut-Cherry Muffins

Makes about 7 muffins

1/2 cup dried Rainier cherries, soaked in hot water until plump, then drained and chopped
3/4 cup light coconut milk
1 Tbsp ground flax seed
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
3 Tbsp canola oil
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla
Shaved coconut

Mix together coconut milk and flax seed and set aside until gooey, then add canola oil, sugar, and vanilla and mix well. Whisk together flours, salt, and baking powder, then add wet ingredients and cherries to flour mixture and stir just until combined. Fill lined muffin tin almost to the top and crumble shaved coconut on top of batter. Bake at 350 degrees for 18 to 20 minutes.

""
""

This entry was posted on Tuesday, June 24th, 2008 at 10:21 PM and is filed under baked goods, breakfast, cherries, coconut, muffins. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo Day 2: Matilda’s Birthday Cake(s)]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-day-2-matildas-birthday-cakes/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-day-2-matildas-birthday-cakes/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:06 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo Day 2: Matilda’s Birthday Cake(s)

""
Last weekend was Matilda’s thirteenth birthday. Scary, I know. And not only do I now live with a teenager, I experienced my first slumber party since I was a teenager. Sure there was a lot of giggling, but hey, I got to make cake! And hummus. And pizza. And since we’re apparently now mini food fetishists, we had mini Bundt cakes. I used the French vanilla cupcake recipe from have cake, will travel but replaced the chocolate extract with almond extract. Holy crap are those things good. They were super moist but not wet and crisped up nicely on the outside. They were a hit with a room full of omnis, which is also a plus. But since plain vanilla cakes aren’t thirteenth-birthday-level festive, they were filled with lemon curd (yeah, I might be obsessed) and drizzled with a lemon glaze and garnished with fresh strawberries. The final pic with the glaze was a little, uh, gross, but the finished cakes were sure tasty.

""
And because every vegan loves hummus, here’s some roasted-garlic hummus, lots of parsley. Posting this pic might just be an excuse to show off the super cute Eva Zeisel dish, though.

""

This entry was posted on Thursday, October 2nd, 2008 at 9:00 PM and is filed under baked goods, cake, dessert, hummus, lemon, lemon curd. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Dan’s Birthday Dinner]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/06/dans-birthday-dinner/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/06/dans-birthday-dinner/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Dan’s Birthday Dinner

""
Last week was my lovely husband Dan’s birthday. But since we had just returned from our Seattle/Portland vacation (where we ate roughly 80,000 calories, I’m estimating) two days before, there wasn’t much time to plan much of a celebration. On the cab ride home from the airport (at 11:30 on a Tuesday. ugh), Dan declared that he wanted cheesy mac and garlic bread for a birthday dinner. Now, due to those roughly 80,000 calories, I wasn’t too stoked on this idea, as what he wanted was one of the first recipes I mastered when I was in college. I have no idea where the original recipe came from, as I think I received a stained print-out from someone along the way. It was incredibly creamy and velvety and delicious but called for loads and loads of both oil and margarine. Add super greasy garlic bread to that, and my vacation-stuffed stomach wasn’t thrilled. So I decided it was finally time to de-fat (at least partially) the recipe and see how it turned out. It still needs some tweaking (I think the tempeh needs to be grated for a more “sausage” like texture, and it could maybe be a bit moister), but overall it was a (much-healthier) success. And it gets even better the next day. The tempeh sausage crumbles are straight from Vegan with a Vengeance (minus the spices I had unexpectedly run out of), but the rest is straight from my head.

Tempeh Cheesy Mac

1/2 cup nutritional yeast
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 – 1 3/4 cup water
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp turmeric
3 Tbsp margarine
paprika
1 1/2 cups macaroni, slightly undercooked
1 recipe tempeh sausage crumbles

Mix nutritional yeast, flour, water, soy sauce, garlice powder, and turmeric together in a small saucepan and heat over medium until thickened. Melt in margarine. In an 8×8 casserole dish, mix together sauce, macaroni, and tempeh and sprinkle with paprika. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes.

And to totally mess up the “healthiness” of the cheesy mac, Dan made his “world famous” garlic bread. Whenever he cooks something, he calls it world famous, even (or maybe especially) when it’s the first time he’s ever made it. I think the only time I’ve disputed this title was when he found a cucumber in the fridge, thought it was a zucchini (not sure how one makes that mistake), and put it in chili! Then again, maybe that is world famous, just not in a good way.

"" And dessert. Strawberry shortcake, with biscuits from Martha, with WAY less sugar on the berries, and whipped Soyatoo. Oh my God, Soyatoo is the best thing ever. Seriously. I whipped it up with half a vanilla bean and a few spoonfuls of sugar, and it reminded me of being a kid and eating spoonful and spoonful of Cool-Whip straight out of the package. I loved that stuff. But knowing that it’s 99% chemicals, 1% whey freaks me out now. So thank you, Soyatoo, for actually resembling whipped cream (or whipped-cream-like product) without being icky. The whole thing was incredible, and such an improvement over those weird little sponge cakes at the grocery store.

""

This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 11th, 2008 at 10:02 PM and is filed under Soyatoo, cheesy mac, dessert, entree, garlic bread, macaroni, nutritional yeast, pasta, strawberry shortcake, tempeh, whipped cream. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » A Work in Progress]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/a-work-in-progress/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/a-work-in-progress/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A Work in Progress

"veganMy husband is responsible for certain things in the kitchen. Stir fries, meaning anything involving tofu and vegetables and rice that doesn’t follow a recipe. Garlic bread. Pancakes. One weekend when he was sick I took over pancake duty, only realizing halfway through that it had probably been nearly a decade since I’d made a pancake.

He makes other things too, of course, occasionally. But those are his specialties. He even refers to anything he makes as “world famous.” He’s especially proud of his “world famous” garlic bread.

Lately Dan has taken up a new mission: donuts. This weekend’s experiment was vegan apple cider donuts. They still need some work, but the flavor was excellent. And any imperfections just means that he’ll have to make them again next weekend. I can’t wait.

Tags: apple cider, breakfast, donuts

This entry was posted on Sunday, October 11th, 2009 at 10:48 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » A New Beginning]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/07/a-new-beginning/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/07/a-new-beginning/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A New Beginning

"apricot"

Yesterday I ate an apricot. Now I know this may not sound very impressive, but it was a big deal. Growing up I loved fruit. I would’ve taken a strawberry over a handful of Nerds any day. And I loved it all. Any variety of fruit found in the produce section of a northern Indiana Kroger store, inevitably I thought it was delicious. With one exception, an exception that was often vocalized: the apricot. But you see, the thing is I can’t remember ever eating an apricot. I must have at some point, I assume, for such a strong aversion to have developed, but I can’t conjure up even the slightest memory of what this fruit could have tasted like. And what if I’d never even eaten a fresh apricot? Perhaps the only fruit of such a name to ever pass my lips was from a can? I had to know. Was my hatred founded? And if not, what other long-held beliefs might be challenged as a result of that discovery? What if, after twenty odd years, I found that I did indeed like every fruit I had ever encountered? Would that lead to other shocking self-discoveries? Would I become a fan of tattoos or animal prints or CBS sitcoms? Considering that as of last week I am now the owner of two string bikinis—one with sparkly silver skulls—I think anything could be possible.

As for the apricot, the flavor was OK, kind of like a more floral, perfumed peach. But the texture was all off, mushy, mealy, wholly unpleasant. At least I tried.

This entry was posted on Thursday, July 30th, 2009 at 8:49 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » A Simple Sweet Potato]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/a-simple-sweet-potato/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/a-simple-sweet-potato/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A Simple Sweet Potato

"Roasted

Never have I been subjected to sweet potatoes sullied by the addition of sugar and marshmallows. This is pure insanity to me. Kind of like taking a taste of soy sauce and saying, “Yeah, it’s salty, but you know what would make it better? Put some salt in it.” Sweet potatoes are sweet. It’s right in the name. Don’t mess with them.

The idea of a vegetable side dish that looks more like a super-rich dessert is disturbing enough, but the truth is, sweet potatoes are one of the most delicious, well-balanced foods in existence. Baked in a hot oven until they get all squishy, they are so hard to resist that I always get a blast of steam in my face when I plunge the knife in the crackly skin. Then I top it with small dabs of Earth Balance and flaky, crunchy Maldon sea salt for a comforting lunch that somehow seems indulgent—creamy, sweet, salty, buttery, utter perfection.

Tags: sweet potatoes, VeganMoFo

This entry was posted on Monday, October 5th, 2009 at 10:59 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo #5: Apple-Pear Crepes with Soyatoo and Toasted Hazelnuts]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-5-apple-pear-crepes-with-soyatoo-and-toasted-hazelnuts/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-5-apple-pear-crepes-with-soyatoo-and-toasted-hazelnuts/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #5: Apple-Pear Crepes with Soyatoo and Toasted Hazelnuts

""
I haven’t done much cooking this week, partly because I’ve been sick for most of it, meaning all I want to eat is toast. If I were less culinarily inclined, I might eat toast twice a day. It’s good food. But also inhibiting my cooking projects this week was the fact that my oven broke. Which I discovered after spending half an hour assembling a Mexican lasagna that now sits in my freezer. But luckily only the oven is out of commission and the stovetop is unaffected. So to make up for the lack of delicious food this week, I spent a ridiculous amount of time making breakfast this morning. Well, that, and to celebrate my first wedding anniversary. OK, that’s probably the only reason I went overboard. It takes the oven being broken to realize that I rely on it heavily for breakfast. Scones, muffins, coffeecake; there’s not much else in my morning repetoire. So today I fancied it up with sweet crepes (from Veganomicon) with sauteed apples and pears, vanilla whipped Soyatoo, and toasted hazelnuts. There was also Chicago Diner style tofu scramble with sunflower and black sesame seeds, but it wasn’t very photogenic. And how can humble tofu stand up next to fancy ass crepes?

Oh, and hazelnuts are delicious and crunchy and all, but it’s much more fun to call them filberts. Especially if you say it in the voice of an eighty-year-old woman. Filberts.

""

This entry was posted on Sunday, October 12th, 2008 at 12:40 PM and is filed under Soyatoo, VeganMoFo, apples, breakfast, creapes, hazelnut, pears. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Mexican Pizza, or: What Happens When I Have to Shop at Jewel]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/05/mexican-pizza-or-what-happens-when-i-have-to-shop-at-jewel/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/05/mexican-pizza-or-what-happens-when-i-have-to-shop-at-jewel/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Mexican Pizza, or: What Happens When I Have to Shop at Jewel

""
Dan and I were on our way home from work and I had nothing planned for dinner. Completely out of character, we decided to go to Jewel. I’ll admit that I have an aversion to normal (i.e., not Whole Foods) grocery stores–something about the two aisles containing nothing but chips and soda–but I’m really against Jewel. It always smells funny. It probably comes from years of living in Wicker Park, home to Junkyard Jewel, which is a truly disgusting place. Plus, the lines are always super long. But at the Jewel I ended up, on a search for something to use as a pizza crust. I knew there wouldn’t likely be anything actually pizza-crust-like to be had, but I thought I’d at least find pita bread. Nope. No pita bread in the whole store. After walking up and down the “natural foods” aisle (gee, that’s a lot of cereal and soy milk) six or seven times, I spied some refried black beans (thank you, Amy), and the Mexican pizza was born. Another search turned up some flour tortillas with fewer than twenty ingredients–as well as a pile of super moldy tortillas. Yum. After an incredibly long wait in line, it was home to assemble the suckers. And you might look at this creation and say, “That looks like a tostada.” Yes, it does look like a tostada, but we wanted pizza, so it’s pizza. Refried black beans between two flour tortillas, topped with melted Teese, olives, red and yellow peppers, avocado, mango, and a lot of Cholula and baked until crispy and melty. Sure, it didn’t quite satisfy the pizza craving, but it was still pretty incredible. How can anything topped with avocado and mango be anything less?

""

This entry was posted on Monday, May 19th, 2008 at 10:54 PM and is filed under Mexican, Teese vegan cheese, avocado, beans, entree, mango, pizza, tortillas. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » A (possibly) Authentic Middle-Eastern Meal]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/03/a-possibly-authentic-middle-eastern-meal/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2010/03/a-possibly-authentic-middle-eastern-meal/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com A (possibly) Authentic Middle-Eastern Meal

"homemadeIn the kitchen, there are a few things that I know to be true. If there is an open jar of peanut butter in the refrigerator, somewhere in the room (smudged on the refrigerator door, hiding out among the natural blotches of the countertop, on the door jamb—yeah, it’s happened) said peanut butter will be smeared. If I turn off the heat-dry function on the dishwasher, as soon as I walk away, it will be on again. Once I even got into a screaming match—with my dishwasher, God help me—as I pressed the button over and over and over, only to watch that little red light pop on again, mocking my futile attempts to make the damn machine do what I wanted it to do. And—this one is very important—you must proof instant yeast. Must. I never trust a recipe that tells me to mix yeast, flour, salt, and water together all at once. No sprinkling the tiny granules on warm-but-not-too-warm water, with just enough sugar to give the yeast a nice little meal? Those recipes are not for me. I worry too much. Will those three-odd cups of flour end up wasted on fickle yeast that refuses to do its job? And what’s the point of making bread/bagels/English muffins/whatnot if your kitchen doesn’t get filled with that wonderful sour smell of blooming yeast? Well, I guess there is some point.

"homemade

But although I’ll still opt for that yeasty smell whenever I can get it, I think I might be a changed woman. Instead of doubting the recipe in front of me and proofing my yeast in an act of rebellion, I dove in. I stirred flour, yeast, salt, olive oil, and water in the Kitchenaid and tried to shut up that nagging voice in my head. “It will work. It’s from Smitten Kitchen. Who’s more trustworthy than Deb? Remember this? And this? And, holy crap, this? What could go wrong?” But still, I couldn’t stop checking the dough in the refrigerator. Was it rising enough? Was that a skin forming on the surface?

"roasted

After all that needless worry, the pita turned out perfectly. They puffed up into little floury balloons in the oven, and when deflated they had thick, doughy bumps perfect for sopping up my take on this Palestinian lentil soup. But the real standout of the meal was the cauliflower, cut into wee little pieces, roasted to almost-burnt caramelization, smothered in a salty-tart tahini-lemon sauce, and scattered with bits of parsley. The original recipe called for enough sauce to turn the crispy pieces of cauliflower soggy before they could even hit the table, and one head of cauliflower can shrink to a paltry portion likely to cause fistfights at the dinner table, so I’ve adjusted both amounts. And if you’re lucky enough to have any left over, it will still be delicious straight from the fridge the next day.

Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce

adapted from The Washington Post

2 heads of cauliflower

olive oil, sea salt, pepper

Cut cauliflower into small, bite-size pieces, coat evenly with a flew glugs of olive oil, spinkle with salt and pepper, and roast in a 450 degree oven for 30-35 minutes, or until starting to turn a roasty brown in spots, tossing every ten minutes or so.

2 1/2 Tbsp tahini

3 Tbsp water

1 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice

1 small clove garlic, finely minced

small handful of flat-leaf parsley, chopped

Combine tahini, water, lemon juice, and garlic until smooth. Toss with warm cauliflower, then sprinkle with parsley.

Tags: bread, cauliflower, lentils, pita, side dish, soup

This entry was posted on Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010 at 9:01 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Thanksgiving, Part 1]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/12/thanksgiving-part-1/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/12/thanksgiving-part-1/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Thanksgiving, Part 1

""I never liked Thanksgiving food all that much. Sure, pie is always good, and my grandma could make the hell out of some pie, and I always loved the sweet potatoes (but only because they were simply roasted with butter, none of that marshmallow crap, which sounds truly disgusting to me and I will never try), but nothing else was of much interest. But once I was able to cook the food for myself and realized that this was a holiday (two whole days off of work) completely devoted to food and shopping, I was in. Dan and I usually make Thanksgiving an opportunity to make food that is a bit more complicated than our everyday meals. And I always have to include as many seasonal foods as possible. Squash and cranberries? Yes, please! This year I set out to conquer pie dough once and for all with two pies, one sweet, one savory. But first up was a soup that I made once before a few years ago, Nigella Lawson’s Lentil Chestnut Soup. I was initially amazed that Nigella had any recipes that were even remotely veganizable, so I had to make it. And every year since, I’ve thought of it over and over. But since peeling fresh chestnuts could send me straight to a mental hospital in less than half an hour, it had to wait for a sale on canned chestnuts. But this soup might have made chestnut-peeling insanity worth it. It’s so velvety and packed with flavor, despite its sad, muddy appearance.
""The main course was a butternut squash and caramelized onion galette. The original recipe had some sort of stinky cheese in it, but it was perfect without. And the dough turned out so flaky. Truly worth all the effort. The Brussles sprouts and golden beets up there, though, not too memorable.
""Seeing that beautiful galette crust, you’d never know that earlier in the day I’d had a huge fight with some dough, throwing it against the wall and ripping it to pieces before finally sacrificing it to the trash can. Which is pretty much the experience I’ve had with pie dough for the past eight years or so. And amazingly, it’s because I tried to listen to Martha Stewart. While she’s given me invaluable advice on other things, girl just doesn’t do shortening. When I first learned how to make pie crust, it was from a recipe my mother had given me that came from my pie-making grandma. Years later I discovered that this might have actually come from the side of the Crisco can, but it made some damn flaky and easy to work with crust. But then I saw Martha. Her dough was so beautiful and thick and it never cracked. But of course using margarine did not work at all. So over the years I’ve tried more and more crust recipes, most of them with disastrous results. This time I went for Martha’s “alternate fat” recipe using shortening. And it was HORRIBLE. It didn’t stay together, it was impossible to roll out, it ended up in the trash. So then I went back to my grandma’s recipe. And everything was perfect. No sticking, no cracking, no banging my head against the countertop. The conclusion? A food processor is no place to make pie crust. It has never ever worked for me. And pastry blenders are just fun to use, so why use anything else?
""For the filling I went with a Martha recipe that I knew was great: Autumn Havest Pie. I made it a few years ago and it was incredible. This time, not so much. The Granny Smith apples were just too tart, and combined with the cranberries it was a bit much. But the natural remedy for this tartness was a scoop of Temptation vanilla ice cream, which helped achieve a perfect sweet/tart balance.
""But the highlight of the day was breakfast. Pumpkin cinnamon rolls. Holy crap are these things amazing. I never make cinnamon rolls because the idea of waiting for dough to rise in the morning when I could just make scones and by nibbling on breakfast and doing a crossword puzzle in half an hour is crazy to me. But I planned ahead and make these the night before, putting them in the refrigerator for the second rise and baking them in the morning. They were perfectly moist and just incredible. Dan said the only thing that could them better would be cream cheese frosting, but I’m sure that would have me keeled over with the sugar shakes halfway to lunch.
""
""

This entry was posted on Tuesday, December 2nd, 2008 at 11:29 PM and is filed under Brussel sprouts, Thanksgiving, apples, baked goods, beets, breakfast, chestnut, cinnamon rolls, cranberries, dessert, entree, galette, lentil, pears, pie, pumpkin, soup, squash. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo #3: Scones!]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-3-scones/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-3-scones/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #3: Scones!

""There’s one good thing about having nagging who demand that I wake up no later than 7:00 ever, even on weekends: A quiet apartment definitely calls for making scones. When Dan and Matilda are asleep I can have the kitchen all to myself to throw together some dough and have it all cleaned up by the time I’m finished with my coffee. I think I love scones more than any other baked good because I can always find ingredients for new combinations within my pantry staples. Dried fruit, frozen fruit, nuts, citrus, they can all usually be found in my kitchen, even before the weekly grocery-store trip.
I’ve tried a lot of different scones over the years, and I think that these almond scones might be the best I’ve ever had. That whole loaded-with-Earth-Balance thing surely doesn’t hurt. The recipe is adapted from Baking by Dorie Greenspan. It’s the only recipe I’ve tried from the book so far, but it sure has pretty pictures. These are totally fantastic with lemon curd or any kind of sweet jam, since the scones themselves have very little sugar.

Almond Scones

3/4 cup almond milk
1 Tbsp ground flax seeds
1/2 cup blanched almonds
2 Tbsp sugar
1/8 tsp almond extract
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
8 Tbsp Earth Balance
1/2 cup chopped toasted almonds
coarse sugar and sliced almonds for top

Preheat oven to 400. Whisk together almond milk and flax seeds and set aside. In a food processor or blender, grind together 1/2 cup blanched almonds and sugar. In a larger bowl mix together flour, baking powder, and salt, then add almond-sugar mixture. Cut in margarine. Add almond extract to milk mixture, then add wet ingredients to dry ingredients until combined. Fold in chopped almonds, then turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and pat into a round about an inch high. Cut into eight triangles and transfer to baking sheet lined with parchment paper or Silpat. Sprinkle tops of scones with sugar and sliced almonds and bake for about 22 minutes.

I also made mini versions of these scones for an after-slumber-party breakfast and they were a huge hit. And both full size and mini turned out nicely crunchy on the outside and tender and flaky on the inside.

""And now for something completely different. Well, you know, as different as one scone can be for another scone. Which probably isn’t that different, actually. These carrot-orange-walnut scones were more cakey than a typical scone, which was actually fine, as the texture made it sort of like eating carrot cake for breakfast, only slightly more socially acceptable.

Carrot-orange-walnut Scones

3/4 cup soy milk
3 Tbsp ground flax seed
2 finely grated carrots, about 1/2 cup
1/4 cup sugar
1 tsp grated orange zest
2 1/4 cups whole-wheat pastry flour, minus 3 Tbsp
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
8 Tbsp Earth Balance
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 425. Whisk together soy milk and flax seed and set aside. In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon, then cut in Earth Balance. Add carrots, sugar, and orange zest to milk mixture, then add to dry ingredients. Fold in walnuts. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and pat into a round about an inch high. Cut into eight triangles and transfer to baking sheet lined with parchment paper or Silpat. Bake for about 22 minutes.

Orange glaze

1/2 cup powdered sugar
1 Tbsp orange juice

Mix together sugar and juice until smooth, then drizzle onto cooled scones.

This entry was posted on Sunday, October 5th, 2008 at 9:37 PM and is filed under almonds, baked goods, breakfast, carrots, orange, scones, walnuts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery ]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/4/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/page/4/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Dan’s Birthday Dinner

Posted by kara on June 11th, 2008

""
Last week was my lovely husband Dan’s birthday. But since we had just returned from our Seattle/Portland vacation (where we ate roughly 80,000 calories, I’m estimating) two days before, there wasn’t much time to plan much of a celebration. On the cab ride home from the airport (at 11:30 on a Tuesday. ugh), Dan declared that he wanted cheesy mac and garlic bread for a birthday dinner. Now, due to those roughly 80,000 calories, I wasn’t too stoked on this idea, as what he wanted was one of the first recipes I mastered when I was in college. I have no idea where the original recipe came from, as I think I received a stained print-out from someone along the way. It was incredibly creamy and velvety and delicious but called for loads and loads of both oil and margarine. Add super greasy garlic bread to that, and my vacation-stuffed stomach wasn’t thrilled. So I decided it was finally time to de-fat (at least partially) the recipe and see how it turned out. It still needs some tweaking (I think the tempeh needs to be grated for a more “sausage” like texture, and it could maybe be a bit moister), but overall it was a (much-healthier) success. And it gets even better the next day. The tempeh sausage crumbles are straight from Vegan with a Vengeance (minus the spices I had unexpectedly run out of), but the rest is straight from my head.

Tempeh Cheesy Mac

1/2 cup nutritional yeast
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 – 1 3/4 cup water
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp turmeric
3 Tbsp margarine
paprika
1 1/2 cups macaroni, slightly undercooked
1 recipe tempeh sausage crumbles

Mix nutritional yeast, flour, water, soy sauce, garlice powder, and turmeric together in a small saucepan and heat over medium until thickened. Melt in margarine. In an 8×8 casserole dish, mix together sauce, macaroni, and tempeh and sprinkle with paprika. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes.

And to totally mess up the “healthiness” of the cheesy mac, Dan made his “world famous” garlic bread. Whenever he cooks something, he calls it world famous, even (or maybe especially) when it’s the first time he’s ever made it. I think the only time I’ve disputed this title was when he found a cucumber in the fridge, thought it was a zucchini (not sure how one makes that mistake), and put it in chili! Then again, maybe that is world famous, just not in a good way.

"" And dessert. Strawberry shortcake, with biscuits from Martha, with WAY less sugar on the berries, and whipped Soyatoo. Oh my God, Soyatoo is the best thing ever. Seriously. I whipped it up with half a vanilla bean and a few spoonfuls of sugar, and it reminded me of being a kid and eating spoonful and spoonful of Cool-Whip straight out of the package. I loved that stuff. But knowing that it’s 99% chemicals, 1% whey freaks me out now. So thank you, Soyatoo, for actually resembling whipped cream (or whipped-cream-like product) without being icky. The whole thing was incredible, and such an improvement over those weird little sponge cakes at the grocery store.

""

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery ]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Brownies, a Failure

Posted by kara on May 29th, 2010

"veganOnce, I had a good vegan brownie. Once. It was my friend Megan’s birthday, and a bunch of ladies met at the Peninsula for high tea. The vegan offerings, while extremely appreciated in such a traditional setting, were hit or miss. The hits: tiny lemon-poppy-seed muffin tops, cranberry-chutney-and-arugula sandwiches, mushroom stacks with pesto. The misses: peanut butter muffins that tasted like freezer burn, under ripe strawberries covered in crunchy unremarkable chocolate, and anything involving tofu (watery parfaits, grainy cheesecake). But the brownies saved it all (well, those and the champagne). They were dense, moist, fudgy, with a crispy top, studded with tiny walnut bits. They were real brownies. They were everything a brownie should be, vegan or not.

"vegan"vegan

See, the problem (or I guess I should say problems) with vegan brownies is that the name usually holds no weight. They’re not brownies. They’re flat chocolate cake, too moist and fluffy. Or they’re square chocolate cookies, too dry and crumbly. They never seem to achieve that balance of gooey and firm, resisting and melty.

"vegan"vegan

So I decided, screw it, I’ll skip all of those inferior vegan brownie recipes and take my chances with a solid-sounding traditional one. Armed with Alice Medrich’s Bittersweet and a bar of Scharffen Berger 99% cacao unsweetened chocolate, I headed to the kitchen. For the seemingly manageable two eggs, I subbed some extra gooey flax goop and a bit of soy yogurt. I melted the chocolate with an unseemly amount of Earth Balance. I dutifully pre-toasted the walnuts. And everything seemed to be going well. The batter looked thick and fudgy and tasted amazing. But that’s when my luck ran out. The oven did little to turn my promising batter into the brownie perfection I was hoping for. It baked for the recommended thirty minutes. Definitely not brownies yet. That’s fine; vegan baked goods always seem to take a bit longer than their egg-laden counterparts. In they stayed for the additional five minutes the recipe said might be necessary. Hmmm. Is that a layer of wet, bubbly fat resting on top of the deep brown still-not-brownies? Another ten minutes. And another. And perhaps another. But then I gave up. By now I had a heavy chocolate brick, unappealingly caramelized on the bottom, covered in melted, unabsorbed margarine on the top.

"vegan"vegan

Maybe I’ll eventually overcome this utter baking disaster and go on to discover the perfect vegan brownie recipe, but it may be easier to set my sights on becoming a lady who lunches so I can spend many more afternoons sipping earl grey and nibbling on pastries at the Peninsula.

"vegan

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Broiled Tofu and Beets with Lemon-dill Yogurt Sauce]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/broiled-tofu-and-beets-with-lemon-dill-yogurt-sauce/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/broiled-tofu-and-beets-with-lemon-dill-yogurt-sauce/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Broiled Tofu and Beets with Lemon-dill Yogurt Sauce

""
A friend of mine is on an extreme elimination diet and is seemingly eating nothing but beets, greens, brown rice, and quinoa. OK, it’s not quite that extreme, but almost. Two words: no salt. But he has inspired me to finally cook beets. I’ve eaten beets plenty, but usually on a salad, where someone else had to deal with the pink hands. Seeing Martha Stewart prepare beets while wearing latex gloves scared me off. But I finally dove in, and it wasn’t bad. The mess rinses off no problem. And beets are delicious, especially with this yogurt sauce. The sauce was maybe a touch too sweet, so next time I’ll reduce, or maybe leave out, the maple syrup (and maybe increase the lemon). But all in all a winning combination. And the sauce was great with the kale too.

Broiled Tofu and Beets with Lemon-dill Yogurt Sauce

1 lb. extra-firm tofu, sliced into eight pieces
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp soy sauce

1 bunch small beets, cut into even chunks
2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp maple syrup

Press tofu for at least ten minutes to remove excess moisture. Whisk together olive oil and soy sauce and dip tofu pieces in the mixture. Drizzle olive oil and maple syrup over beets, season with salt and pepper, and toss. Place tofu and beets on foil-lined baking sheet and place in broiler. I set my broiler and high and cooked for nearly twenty minutes, tossing the beets every once in a while and turning tofu halfway through. But keep on eye on it, as broilers can vary a lot.

Lemon-dill Yogurt Sauce

1/2 cup plain soy yogurt (I used Silk)
2 Tbsp chopped dill
1 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice
1-2 Tbsp chopped shallot
1 tsp maple syrup
salt and pepper to taste

Whisk together all ingredients in a small bowl. Serve with tofu and beets.

""

This entry was posted on Tuesday, July 15th, 2008 at 10:37 PM and is filed under beets, dill, entree, lemon, tofu, yogurt. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Vegan Madeleines]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/03/vegan-madeleines/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/03/vegan-madeleines/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Vegan Madeleines

""I’ve been thinking about starting this blog–and taking a lot of pictures–for a long time, so it may seem a little odd that my first post is something that didn’t turn out as well as I would have liked it to. But failure is often a big part of vegan cooking. So this is a learning a post. I tried to veganize something I never even tried in a non-vegan state, which is odd, and although the results weren’t as pretty as those perfect little packages at the Starbucks counter, they were tasty. And who can resist those tiny little flecks of vanilla seeds?

Vegan Vanilla Bean Madeleines–first trial

2 Tbsp ground flax seed
6 Tbsp water
6 Tbsp margarine, melted
3/4 cup flour
1 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 vanilla bean

Preheat oven to 400. Blend flax seed and water in blender until gelatinous. Sift flour, baking powder, and salt, then flax mixture, margarine, and vanilla and mix until combined. Grease madeleine pan and fill each mold 3/4 full. Bake for ten minutes.

I used a mini madeleine pan, because mini=cute, so maybe a larger pan would have resulted in a less crispy cookie. And if you fill the molds too much, the cookies get a strange rim around the edge. This batch came out a little oily and cupcake-like, with an odd, faint taste of popcorn, probably from the spray oil. Next time I’ll definitely take the time to melt some extra marge. But the edges did come out nicely crispy. And despite the popcorny-ness, they were tasty.

""
""

This entry was posted on Sunday, March 30th, 2008 at 8:36 PM and is filed under baked goods, cookies, dessert, vanilla bean, vegan madeleines. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Lemon-Pine-Nut Scones with Vegan Lemon Curd]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/lemon-pine-nut-scones-with-vegan-lemon-curd/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/07/lemon-pine-nut-scones-with-vegan-lemon-curd/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:07 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Lemon-Pine-Nut Scones with Vegan Lemon Curd

""
The way I see it, vegan scones usually have one of two problems: 1) They’re so dry you fear losing a tooth every time you bite into them, or 2) they’re too moist and fluffy, resembling flat muffins more than scones. I always used to use a recipe from Everyday Food magazine, which was touted as lower fat and didn’t use any eggs. But these always fell on the too-fluffy side, although if I put enough cranberries or blueberries in them I didn’t so much care. But this time I wanted nice, semi-dry, flaky scones. This lemon-pine-nut version isn’t quite there, they were a little too floury and fluffy, but with some tweaking I think they’ll get there. And they don’t have two sticks of butter like so many of the recipes I consulted.

Lemon-Pine-Nut Scones

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top
1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp baking powder
6 Tbsp margarine
3 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup soy milk, plus more for brushing tops of scones
1/4 cup pine nuts

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Whisk together flours, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Cut in margarine with a pastry cutter until it is in small sandy pieces. Mix in lemon juice and soy milk, turn out onto clean work surface, and pat into a round about 1-1 1/2 inches high. Use a bench scraper or other semi-sharp straight edge to cut dough into eight triangles. Brush each scone with soy milk and sprinkle with sugar (I use the vegan sugar carried at Whole Foods, which is nice and coarse and makes for a crunchy top, much like sanding sugar; finer-grained sugar will create more of a crust on top). Transfer to a baking sheet lined with Silpat or parchment and bake for 15 to 17 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool (the scones will be a bit tender when they’re warm but will get crunchier as they cool).

Oh, and about that lemon curd. It is forking incredible. I used a recipe from Bryanna Clark Grogan, which I’ve been eying forever. I should’ve made it the night before so it could have time to cool and thicken, but it was still delicious as a sort of sauce on the scones. But once it did cool, it was so thick and gelatinous. It’s the lemon curd I’ve dreamt about ever since the Chicago Diner so cruelly decided to make their wonderful lemon coconut cake special-order only. Maybe soon I’ll make a lemon-curd pie, which would satisfy my urge to eat the stuff with a spoon but wouldn’t feel so pathetic.

""

This entry was posted on Wednesday, July 2nd, 2008 at 9:43 PM and is filed under baked goods, breakfast, lemon, lemon curd, pine nuts, scones. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Totchos]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/totchos/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/totchos/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Totchos

"totchos"

After college I came to Chicago and moved in with my best friend, Amanda. And let’s just say we didn’t have the healthiest eating habits. We went to the grocery store maybe once a month, bought as many non-perishables as we could carry from car to apartment in one trip, and hoped we didn’t have to go back for a while. Considering that one of our first joint trips to Dominick’s included an overgrown frat boy making lewd comments while we tried to choose cucumbers, it’s not really a mystery why we didn’t go back often. Our haul generally consisted of a few loaves of bread (some to freeze before they got moldy), boxes of veggie burgers and various frozen fake meat products, frozen broccoli (for me), canned green beans (for her), instant mashed potatoes, boxes of a now-forgotten brand of Mexican rice, and an instant coffee-cake mix that came with a disposable baking tray and a bag to mix the batter in, perfect for a couple of kitchen-lazy girls with no dishwasher.

But our absolute favorite disgusting convenience food was Betty Crocker hash browns. They cost about 89 cents a box and were perfect for two people, mine slathered in a repulsive amount of ketchup, hers not. They were so good, in fact, salty and buttery and crispy in all the right places, that I would probably still eat them today if they hadn’t been discontinued. I’d probably just skip the step of checking out the nutritional information before chucking them in the cart.

I’ve been thinking about those convience foods a lot lately, and I was reminded of the last time Amanda visited, when she told me about something she’d been eating a lot lately: tater tot nachos, or totchos. I finally tried it tonight, and it was exactly what I needed after a horrible commute. A pile of warm, crispy tater tots globbed with spicy refried beans, a quick nutritional yeast cheese sauce, pepper-heavy salsa, and green Tabasco. Somehow the tots, with their steaming, fluffy interiors, seem more suited to an especially chilly, rainy fall night than a handful of tortilla chips.

Tags: nachos, tater tots, totchos, VeganMoFo

This entry was posted on Thursday, October 8th, 2009 at 11:25 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Penne with Roasted Delicata Squash and Vegan Mornay Sauce]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/penne-with-roasted-delicata-squash-and-vegan-mornay-sauce/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/penne-with-roasted-delicata-squash-and-vegan-mornay-sauce/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Penne with Roasted Delicata Squash and Vegan Mornay Sauce

"Vegan

Until a few years ago I hadn’t ever cooked winter squash. Hell, I probably hadn’t even ever eaten winter squash outside of the canned pumpkin in a pie. They always seemed so daunting. The peeling, the cleaning of the seeds, the stained hands. And then there was the cutting. In my mind it was akin to opening a coconut, and one slip of the (very dull) knife in my (very clumsy) hand and I’d be down a finger. But maybe the acquisition of a couple of proper grown-up knives gave me courage.

I started with acorn squash. They’re so cute and curvy and ready for stuffing. So they became a Thanksgiving centerpiece. But the flesh came out stringy and dry and mushy, making for nothing more than a really pretty and seasonally appropriate bowl.

And then I found this. The simplest, most delicious butternut squash soup you could hope for, perfect for topping with cranberry compote for a really stunning color combination. And I haven’t looked back since.

Last year I fell in love with the delicata squash. It’s sometimes hard to find, and its smaller size and less flashy appearance make it easy to overlook. But here’s the thing: You can eat the skin. Meaning none of that annoying peeling. Just chop it up, toss it in olive oil, salt, and pepper, and throw it in the oven for a wonderfully comforting side dish that’s nicely crunchy on the outside, with a bite provided by the slightly waxy skin, and incredibly smooth on the inside. Or do as I did here and, after roasting, toss it with penne and a vegan mornay sauce for an indulgent, grown-up version of mac and cheese. And don’t forget to roast the seeds (delicata is a way better payoff here than stingy butternut) and sprinkle them on top.

The best part? Matilda, who had recently decried a loaf of pumpkin bread for being ” too pumpkiny,” said, without prodding, “I like this squash.” Success.

Vegan Mornay Sauce

adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child et al.

I used Teese vegan cheese in this sauce, as I prefer its flavor over other brands. And when I opened the pantry to grab the flour and realized the all-purpose canister was empty, I used whole-wheat pastry flour instead, which worked just fine. This is best served very hot, as it loses it’s silky texture as it cools.

1 Tbsp Earth Balance Margarine

1 1/2 Tbsp flour

1 cup unsweetened soy milk

Approximately 1/4 cup mozzarella-style vegan cheese, grated

salt and pepper to taste

Heat soy milk in small saucepan or in the microwave until warmed through. Melt margarine in small saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in flour and let the mixture bubble, stirring constantly, for about two minutes. Slowly pour in heated soy milk. Whisk until the sauce thickens and can coat the back of a spoon. This should only take a couple of minutes.

Tags: pasta, sauces, VeganMoFo, winter squash

This entry was posted on Saturday, October 3rd, 2009 at 10:45 AM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Victory!]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/08/victory/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/08/victory/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Victory!

""
Last week my twelve-year-old stepdaughter moved in with us. Food-wise this is a little on a scary side, as a normal kid who’s used to a lot of Kraft mac &amp; cheese being forced to eat vegan is a bit of a difficult thing. But even more difficult than that: the kid hates onions! She’ll let them slide if they’re in a store-bought jar (salsa, pasta sauce), but otherwise the onions turn her off the whole meal. Well, this would not do. If my hands don’t smell like onions and garlic, I probably didn’t eat well the night before. Onions make everything better. I suspect there’s even a way to put onions in cookies and have it be delicious. So I decided to dive in and confront this thing head on: ratatouille. There’s no way to take the onions out of that, at least not with good results. And the impossible happened; not only did she eat it, she loved it. She even said she couldn’t taste the onions and didn’t even pick them out. Success! I don’t think this means I’ll be making French onion soup anytime soon, but you never know. Now on to the next challenge: kale.

(I used a recipe from some old issue of Martha Stewart Living I’ve had ripped out and stuffed in a folder for who knows how long. The eggplant and zucchini were roasted before they were stewed with everything else, so they kept their shape nicely. And, funny enough, the recipe called for too many onions for my taste, but otherwise it was excellent, though I can’t seem to find it online.)

This entry was posted on Tuesday, August 26th, 2008 at 10:00 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Raw Beet Salad]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/08/raw-beet-salad/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/08/raw-beet-salad/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Raw Beet Salad

"raw-beet-salad"

I used to be terrified of beets. I was convinced that cooking them would be a horribly messy ordeal, with blood red blotches forever marring my kitchen counter, my baking dishes, my hands, the shirt I inevitably wouldn’t even think to change before tackling the juicy mess. But at some point I dove in. I bought a bunch of deep red beets, hauled out the aluminum foil, and fired up the oven. And when the roots came out of the oven and the foil, the skins slid right off, no vegetable peeler spewing tiny, staining pieces of skin all over the kitchen wall as I had feared. And the color on my hands? It rinsed right off. I hardly even needed soap. But none of that really matters for this salad, since working with raw beets is about as messy as working with raw carrots. I used Chiogga here, because they’re pretty and make for a nice pink salad—or because that’s what the farmer’s market had, whatever. And there isn’t really a recipe, just shred peeled raw beets in a food processor and toss with a simple vinaigrette. Mine was lemon juice, Dijon mustard, olive oil, salt, and pepper, but garlic and parsley are also excellent additions. It’s a crunchy, refreshing side salad that goes great with a Mediterranean spread. It does tend to go all slimy the next day though, so eat immediately.

This entry was posted on Saturday, August 1st, 2009 at 12:18 AM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo #7: Love for Isa]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-7-love-for-isa/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-7-love-for-isa/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo #7: Love for Isa

""I had the best intentions of blogging the hell out of VeganMoFo. But as always, complications arose. First off, my oven broke, making a recent trip to the farmer’s market a new kind of hell where everywhere I looked I saw beautiful fall vegetables just begging to be roasted. But today, thanks to $180 and a man named Ivan, I’ve got an oven again. After nearly three ovenless weeks, what’s a girl to bake? Cookies! I decided that in between making Matilda’s Halloween costume (my first very amateurish adventure in this kind of frightening arena) and finally getting up another blog post, I’d throw together one of my favorite easy cookie recipes, pumpkin oatmeal cookies from Vegan with a Vengence. They have flax seed, walnuts, molasses, and oats in them, so they’re practically health food, right? Well, except maybe for the white flour, sugar, oil, and chocolate chips. But that’s at least a balance of good and bad, so I’m going with it. I can’t wait to eat some tomorrow, as they are way better the next day, nice and chewy.

And while I’m proving that roughly 82% of my culinary repetoire relies on Ms. Isa Moskowitz, I might as well write about last night’s dinner, seitan chops smothered in apples and ginger. I had to saute the apples, since the oven was not yet fixed, but they turned out great. And even though I think I misread the seitan instructions just a bit (I formed the dough into four chops before boiling, meaning I had very thick chops in the end) and had a bit of trouble getting the breading to stick (that never quite works for me), they turned out great. The inside was so tender, a little like a super dense bread. Maybe due to the altered boiling technique, maybe due to the chickpea flour, but this seitan was very different from any other I’ve made, and I loved it. Spongy yet toothsome. It was a nice balance, as were all the flavors in the dish. I took it easy on the ginger, as I’m just getting over a long-held hatred of the stuff, but it came out totally mellow and warm and wonderful. And really, what’s better than getting to eat apples and cranberries for dinner? It was sort of like eating a totally sophisticated version of my oh-so-high-class childhood favorite, pork chops and applesauce.

""

This entry was posted on Monday, October 27th, 2008 at 10:41 PM and is filed under VeganMoFo, apples, baked goods, chocolate, cookies, cranberries, dessert, entree, ginger, pumpkin, seitan, walnuts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » Apple Almond-Butter Cookies]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/apple-almond-butter-cookies/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2009/10/apple-almond-butter-cookies/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com Apple Almond-Butter Cookies

"appleWhen Dan and I were first living together, I watched a lot of Food Network. I mean, A LOT. I was just learning how to really cook, and the pre-Rachael Ray Food Network chefs, plus as much Martha Stewart as I could injest, relaly helped me to learn all the basics. These days I think the only cook left on TV who actually teaches anything is Alton Brown, and I am amazed and grateful that Food Network still keeps him around (and hasn’t convinced him that he would be more popular if he put a pound of butter in everything).

A side effect of this culinary TV obsession was that I really, really wanted a Kitchenaid mixer. I wasn’t totally sure what I needed it for, but it was so pretty! So shiny! I was convinced that I couldn’t be serious about cooking without one. Dan and I talked them up so much, we ended up getting one for Christmas from each of our moms. (The next year we got two blenders, but we’ve since learned to coordinate our lists.)

But in the years since the mixer appeared in our kitchen, it hasn’t been nearly as useful as I thought it would be. So pretty! and So shiny! turned into So heavy! and So hard to move! Especially since I decided that counter space was more important than a convenient way to cream butter and sugar and moved the mixer to a bottom cabinet. And anyway, I discovered that I actually like doing by hand the things the Kitchenaid does so well. Half the point of making bread is the therapy involved in the kneading process—plus, the intense bicep workout is always appreciated.

Which is why I didn’t automatically pull out the old heifer when I decided to make cookies. I thought, I hardly ever make cookies, I should enjoy it, not rush through it and let a machine do all the work. But what I learned is that sometimes you should take help where you can get it. Because creaming butter and sugar by hand? Annoying and frustrating and ultimately not very fruitful. In the end, everything worked out, the cookies came together nicely, and I didn’t have to clean batter off the Kitchenaid. Still, next time, I’ll haul the hulking girl out of her hiding place.

Apple Almond-Butter Cookies

These are based on my favorite fall afternoon snack, crisp, juicy apple slices dipped in creamy, salty almond butter. Almond butter makes for a richer, smoother cookie than peanut butter, so smaller is better for these.

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 tsp baking soda

1 tsp cornstarch

1/8 tsp salt

2 1/2 Tbsp Earth Balance, softened

1/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup creamy, salted almond butter

1/4 tsp vanilla

1 Tbsp almond milk (add more for a less crumbly texture)

1/4 cup dried apples, diced

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix flour, baking soda, cornstarch, and salt in small bowl. Cream togehter Earth Balance and sugars. Add flour mixture into butter mixture. Mix in almond butter, vanilla, and almond milk until well incorporated. Fold in apples. Drop tablespoon-size pieces onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and flatten with the tines of a fork. They don’t spread much, so you don’t need to leave too much room between cookies. Bake for about 10 minutes. Let cool on baking sheet until they are solid enough to move, then finish cooling on baking rack.

Tags: almond butter, apples, cookies, desserts

This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 13th, 2009 at 11:17 PM and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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<![CDATA[Cookery & Cakery » Blog Archive » VeganMoFo Day 1: It’s Food, Just Really, Really Small]]> http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-day-1-its-food-just-really-really-small/ http://www.cookeryandcakery.com/2008/10/veganmofo-day-1-its-food-just-really-really-small/ Fri, 02 Mar 2018 03:13:08 -0500 www.cookeryandcakery.com VeganMoFo Day 1: It’s Food, Just Really, Really Small

""Recently my friend Mary hosted a mini food party. The original idea was just to make a few tiny, maybe complicated, things, but soon the guest list tripled, and we all panicked that there wouldn’t be enough food. Man were we wrong. There was so much food that even the champion eaters among us met their limits (and by “met their limits” I mean “retreated to the backyard in case they had to puke”). There’s something about making food very small that makes you think you can eat at least twice as much of it. But before the coma set in, everything was really delicious. Some of the highlights (desserts first, of course):

Mary’s chocolate-chip cheesecakes

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Megan’s mini apple pies with vanilla ice cream, homemade caramel sauce, and peanuts

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Mini root beer floats! With mini straws!

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Mary’s lemon cheesecakes

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Cass’s cinnamon rolls

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Cass’s chocolate-chip cookies. Maybe the best chocolate-chip cookies I’ve ever had.

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Megan’s mini trifles. Well, mini might be a bit misleading. The glasses may have been small, but it was still a lot of trifle. I don’t know how she makes that vegan whipped cream (it’s sort of half custard, half whipped cream) but it’s incredible.

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Lemon and lime curd tartlets, by me. Awhile ago I threatened to make an entire pie out of just Bryanna’s lemon curd and Soyatoo. This was my not-so-pathetic answer to that desire. So sour, so good.

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Megan’s mini burgers

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Mary’s sushi, delicious as always

""Mini tortilla cups filled with guacamole and garnished with mango and cherry tomato. Mine.

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Cherry tomatoes stuffed with mixed olive tapenade, by me. These were a pain in the ass, to say the least. The next time I’m browsing through Martha Stewart’s Hor D’oeuvres Handbook and I say, “Ooh, those are cute,” I have to think about the crazy amount of work involved. Cutting the centers out of a couple of pints of cherry tomatoes takes forever. They sure were tasty though.

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Mary’s grilled BLTs with basil mayonnaise

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Candice’s twice-baked potatoes (really excellent, especially considering Candice had never even eaten a twice-baked potato before)

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The leftovers. Yeah, we might’ve made too much food.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, October 1st, 2008 at 8:55 PM and is filed under VeganMoFo, appetizers, cheesecake, cinnamon rolls, cookies, dessert, lemon curd, mini food, parties, pie, sushi, tartlets, trifles. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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